70 Best Games played in Rio’s Maracanã Stadium in 70 Years

O Globo newspaper has polled 70 experts to come up with the top 70 games played in Rio’s iconic Maracanã Stadium since it first opened 70 years ago in June 1950 prior to the World Cup.  The panel’s top ten most memorable and important games were: 

1º — Brazil 1 x 2 Uruguay

World Cup Final, 16 July 1950

2º — Vasco 1 x 2 Santos

Campeonato Brasileiro, 31 August 1969 (Pelé’s 1,000th goal)

3º — Germany 1 x 0 Argentina

World Cup Final, 13 July 2014

4º — Brazil 2 x 0 Uruguay

World Cup Qualifications, 19 September 1993

5º — Santos 1 x 0 Milan

Copa Intercontinental, 16 November 1963

6º — Brazil 1 (5) x (4) 1 Germany

Olympic Final, 20 August 2016

7º — Fluminense 2 x 2 Flamengo

Campeonato Carioca, 25 June1995

8º — Botafogo 1 x 0 Flamengo

Campeonato Carioca, 21 June 1989

9º — Brasil 2×0 Chile

World Cup Qualifications, 3 September 1989

10º — Brazil 1 x 0 Paraguay

World Cup Qualifications, 31 August 1969

1970 FIFA World Cup: Brazil’s Cup


50 years ago the 1970 FIFA World Cup took place in Mexico from 31 May to 21 June.

75 teams tried to qualify for Mexico, but only 16 could take part in four groups of four in the qualifying stage of the finals, with the top two from each group going into the quarterfinals. It was the first World Cup held outside South America and Europe; the first to be televised in colour; substitutes were allowed for the first time; and red and yellow cards were introduced, although no player was sent off during the tournament. Brazil was drawn in Group 3 with holders England, Romania and Czechoslovakia.

Wednesday, 3 June 1970, saw four group games at the FIFA World Cup in Mexico including the tournament debut of Brazil against Czechoslovakia. Czechoslovakia scored first, but Brazil went on to win the match 4-1 thanks to goals by Rivelino, Pele and two from Jairzinho. 

On Sunday, June 7 1970, one of the greatest games in World Cup history was played in Guadalajara between Brazil and England. Brazil won the game one-nil, Jairzinho scoring. Either side could have won, and it would not have been unfair if it had ended 4-4. Gordon Banks made his famous save from Pele, and made a number of other key saves to keep Brazil out, while Bobby Moore played possibly his greatest game in defence. At the other end Felix proved he had more lives than many cats, while it was Brazil’s captain, Carlos Alberto, who had to do a lot of the tidying up. The result meant both team were favourites to progress from Group 3.

The third and final round of the group stage of the World Cup took place on Wednesday, 10 June. Brazil defeated Romania three-two to guarantee its place in the quarter finals and top its group. Pele scored twice for Brazil and, of course, Jairzinho netted one.

On Sunday, 14 June 1970, all four quarter final matches of the 1970 FIFA World Cup were played. Producing some classic games, West Germany, the only unbeaten side in the tournament along with Brazil, beat the holders, England, three-two after extra time in a rematch of the 1966 final. The hosts, Mexico, were beaten 4-1 by an Italian side coming into form, while it took Uruguay to the 117th minute and extra time to score the one goal that sent the Soviet Union home. The fourth quarter final saw Brazil beat fellow South Americans, Peru, four-two thanks to goals by Rivellino, Jairzinho, and two from Tostao. 

The two semi-finals were played on Wednesday, 17 June, with Brazil facing Uruguay in and all South American semi-final while the other was an all European affair with Italy taking on West Germany. All the semi-finalists were past winners of the World Cup, Brazil, Italy and Uruguay having won it twice, and West Germany once. The only other country to win the World Cup was England. Brazil overcame Uruguay three-one, Uruguay scored first before goals from Clodoaldo, Jairzinho and Rivelino saw Brazil safely through to its fourth final. 

The second semi-final is considered a World Cup classic with Italy finally overcoming West Germany four-three after extra time. Full time had ended one-one with Germany scoring in the final minute of normal time, before five goals were scored in extra time. Germany would beat Uruguay one-nil in the third place play off.

The final on Sunday 21 June in front of 107,412 fans at the Azteca Stadium in Mexico City saw two-time champions Brazil and Italy playing, the winner knowing they would get to keep the Jules Rimet trophy as three time winners. Brazil scored first through Pele, before Italy equalised to end the first half at one-one, but the second half was all Brazil in an exhilarating exhibition of attacking football. Gerson put Brazil ahead in the 21st minute, with Jairzinho scoring in the 26th minute to be the only player to score in every round and match of a World Cup. The icing on the cake was the final goal scored by the Brazilian captain, Carlos Alberto, after nearly every Brazilian player had touched the ball as they took it from deep in their half to score. The goal is generally considered the best scored in World Cup history and for many that Brazilian team is considered the greatest team ever.

Brazil has gone on to win the World Cup twice more in 1994 and 2002, and was the losing finalist in 1998. It has also hosted the World Cup final in1950 and more recently in 2014.  

 

 

Brazil hosts three of the most viewed art shows in 2019

 

The three most viewed art shows in the world in 2019, by the number of visitors a day, were all organised by the Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil.

Occupying the first and second spots in the The Art Newspaper ranking was the free travelling exhibition that offered a behind-the-scenes look at DreamWorks. Co-organised by the animation studio and Melbourne’s Australian Centre for the Moving Image, 11,380 visitors a day went to it at the CCBB Rio de Janeiro, while a further 9,277 daily saw it at the CCBB Belo Horizonte. 

In third was Ai Weiwei’s travelling survey in Brazil— the highest-ranking show by a single artist in the list. More than 1.1 million people in total saw the exhibition in Brazil that started in São Paulo with stops in Belo Horizonte and Curitiba before arriving at the CCBB Rio de Janeiro, where it was seen by 9,172 visitors a day (around 600,000 in total).

The CCBB last topped the Art Newspaper survey in 2016 with another trio of shows, including one on Post-Impressionist masterpieces (9,700 visitors a day). The CCBB, which hosts free exhibitions at its four locations in Brazil, had nearly 5.6 million visitors in 2019—a 28% increase on 2018 and a 36% increase on 2017. Sadly numbers will not be the same in 2020.

Brazil represented in Berlin by All the Dead Ones

Brazil will be represented in competition at the Berlinale – Berlin International Film Festival by Marco Dutra and Caetano Gotardo’s period drama “All The Dead Ones” (Todos os Mortos), a film set in late 19th century São Paulo, shortly after the abolition of slavery.

The film focuses on a mother and her two daughters from a formerly wealthy coffee plantation-owning family that has gone into financial decline amid the changing backdrop of Brazil at the turn of the century. At the same time, the film follows the women’s former slaves who are struggling to find their place in society.

Dutra’s credits include “Good Manners” (As Boas Maneiras), edited by Gortardo, which won over 31 festival awards including the Locarno Film Festival jury prize in 2017, and at Festival do Rio l Rio de Janeiro Int’l Film Festival it won best film, best cinematography, best supporting actress, the festival’s Felix Award and the FIPRESCI prize.

Frank Sinatra in Rio: January 1980

40 years ago, in January 1980, the unlikely figure of the Chairman of the Board, Frank Sinatra, arrived in Rio de Janeiro. He landed on 21 January at Rio’s international airport to be the star attraction at the opening of a new five star hotel on Rio’s Copacabana Beach, the Rio Palace. A property that has been recently renovated and is now the Fairmont Rio.

Sinatra had been brought to Rio by the head of the Artplan advertising agency, Roberto Medina, a name familiar now as the man behind the famous Rock in Rio festivals. But it is unlikely that without the visit of Sinatra in 1980 that Rock in Rio would ever have taken place five years later, or that the gates would have opened for other major performers and artists to come to Brazil.

Medina had already worked with Sinatra, having used Ol Blue Eyes in an advert for the Brazilian bottled Scotch Whisky, Passport. Medina had also used David Niven and Burt Bacharach as part of the campaign. Sinatra also had his own links to Brazil having performed and recorded an album with Tom Jobim in 1967, which they followed up with a second in 1969.

Medina paid Sinatra a reported US$1 million for five shows in Rio. Four of these would be for an exclusive nightly audience of just 700 in the Rio Palace’s ballroom on the 22, 23, 24 and 25 of January 1980. The fifth show was altogether more ambitious, a stadium show on Saturday, 26 January at the Maracanã Stadium, which would also be broadcast in Brazil on TV Globo.

The shows at the Rio Palace were the place to be and be seen in Brazil that week of January 1980 (each ticket costing over US$1,000), and did what they were intended to do by putting the hotel on the map, both in Brazil and internationally. Few hotels outside of Las Vegas had the clout to attract Sinatra.

The famous concert at the Maracanã Stadium nearly did not take place, however, due to the weather. It was an open stage located right in the centre of the pitch. The special seats on the grass, closest to the uncovered stage, had been the first to sell out at US$160 each, with tickets in the stands costing just US$6.

Due to the persistent rain on the Friday and through Saturday, it was impossible to mic and wire the orchestra, and for a time it looked as if the concert would be called off and fall foul to the weather. And there was no back up date as Sinatra had to return to the US.

At 21.00, on the night of 26 January, Sinatra walked on stage just as the rain stopped and performed to the largest crowd of his career, 175,000 people, a crowd that went into the Guinness Book of record as the largest paying audience for a single act.

In honour of Brazil, Sinatra started with “The Coffee Song” which he followed by his repertoire of hits including “The Lady is a Tramp”, “I’ve Got You Under My Skin”, “Someone To Watch Over Me”, “My Way”, “Strangers In the Night”, which the crowd sang with Sinatra when he appeared to forget the lyrics, and his new hit that year, “New York, New York”. In all Sinatra performed for one hour and forty-five minutes.

Not only were Sinatra’s shows in Rio historic, but it showed that Brazil could hold major concerts. Sinatra was followed at Maracanã by Sting, Tina Turner, Kiss, Madonna, The Police, The Rolling Stones, Roger Waters, and the Pope, no-less, and in 1991 Medina’s own Rock in Rio II with headline acts such as Prince, Santana, George Michael, Guns’n Roses, A-ha! and INXS among others. But it was to be Sir Paul McCartney who, on another wet Saturday, would break Sinatra’s record for the paying public for a single act, when he sold an estimated 180,000 tickets for his show at the Maracanã

Sinatra was to return to play Brazil one more time, in August 1981 when he played the Maksoud Plaza hotel in São Paulo.

Rio Star: Giant Observation Wheel is new Rio attraction

Rio de Janeiro gained a major new attraction, its own Rio Eye, or rather Rio Star, on 6 December 2019. 

The giant wheel is 88 metres high (compared with the London Eye’s 135 metres) and has 54 cabins that each can hold 8 people. Tickets cost R$50, or about £10 (compared with London’s £30). The wheel, the largest in Latin America, is located in the port area, close to Centro, overlooking the bay of Rio, and close to the city’s new aquarium and the excellent museums of Tomorrow and Rio Art.

For more information and to book tickets CLICK HERE

Rio Film Festival highlights for 2019

Festival do Rio, Rio’s international film festival, celebrates its 20th anniversary and 21st edition in 2019 and for the first time takes place in December. It has been a year when  Festival do Rio has had to turn to the support of its many collaborators, supporters, producers and friends from around the world to take place as sponsorship for cultural events friend up in Rio and Brazil.

For 2019 Festival do Rio offers a compact selection of around 100 top international productions that include many cinematographic highlights from 2019 as well as some of the most anticipated films set for release in 2020. The festival also offers its extensive window onto the most recent Brazilian productions that screen as part of Premiere Brasil.

Première Brasil is one of the most anticipated and popular sections of Festival do Rio, and the main competitive section of the festival, and in 2019 will screen nearly 90 features and shorts by new and established Brazilian directors, films that offer the most varied themes and stories from every region and corner of  this vast country.

Première Brasil also gives audiences the chance to see the films and then meet and talk with the filmmakers and actors. The cinema going public also votes for the best film in the categories of fiction, documentary and short, while an official jury awards the festival’s Redentor trophy across a diverse range of categories from the films in official competition.

Part of Première Brasil  is New Trends (Novos Rumos), another competitive section of the festival that has grown in popularity each year with Rio audiences, and screens nine features and seven shorts in 2019 from new and established directors.

Also part of Première Brasil, Musicals Portraits will present six films this year looking at personalities, facts and institutions relevant to the history of Brazilian music and Brazil. Due to the diversity of themes, other Brazilian films will be screened across Festival do Rio in sections as varied as Panorama, Première Latina, Unique Itineraries, Frontiers and Generations.

Arturo Ripstein, Ken Loach, Terrence Mallick, Serge Losnitza, Lav Diaz, Clint Eastwood, Celine Schiamma, Jim Jarmusch, Christoph Honoré, Abel Ferrara, Ira Sachs, Marco Bellocchio, the Dardenne Brothers, Pedro Costa, Xavier Dolan, Werner Herzog, Marielle Heller, Robert Eggers, Alain Cavalier, and many other great directors, will all be represented and have their films screen over 11 days in December at 15 theatres that stretch across the city.

Festival do Rio opens its 21st edition on 9 December with Greta Gerwig’s long-awaited Little Women at the traditional Cine Odeon – Luiz Severiano Ribeiro Cultural Center in downtown Rio. Other festival highlights will include Jay Roach’s critically acclaimed Bombshell, featuring Charlize Theron and Nicole Kidman, about charges of sexual abuse filed against Fox News’ Roger Ailes. And the Toronto Festival-winning comedy JoJo Rabbit by Taika Waititi, with Scarlett Johansson, about a  little boy who has Hitler as an imaginary friend.

The latest works of award-winning directors will be shown during the festival, such as Ken Loach’s Sorry We Missed You, Terrence Malick’s A Hidden Life, Clint Eastwood’s Richard Jewell, Jim Jarmusch’s The Dead Don’t Die, Abel Ferrara’s Tommaso, Christopher Honoré’s On A magical Night,  Ira Sachs’s Frankie, with Isabelle Huppert, Rupert Goold’s Judy,with Renée Zellweger, Lav Diaz’s The Halt, Xavier Dolan’s Matthias & Maxime, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood by Marielle Heller, with Tom Hanks, The Traitor by Marco Bellocchio, Family Romance by Werner Herzog, Vitalina Varelaand In the bedroom of Vanda by Pedro Costa, Young Ahmed by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, among others.

The festival will also offer:

  • great documentaries such as Sergei Loznitsa’s State Funeral, Alain Cavalier’s Être vivant et le savoir, Alan Elliott and Sydney Pollack’s Amazing Grace, Diego Maradona by Asif Kapadia, Nomad: In the Footsteps of Bruce Chatwinby Werner Herzog, Citizen K by Alex Gibney, Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Kim Longinotto’s Shooting the Mafia, Victor Kossakovsky’s Aquarela, The Capote Tapes by Ebs Burnough, The Kingmaker by Lauren Greenfield, and Memory – The Origins of Alie, by Alexandre O. Philippe
  • the year’s discoveries such as Alma Har’el’s Honey Boy, Ladj Ly’s Les Misérables, Oliver Laxe’s O que arde, Dylda, by Kantemir Balagov, And Then We Dance by Levan Akin, John Nicholau’s Technoboss, La virgen de agosto by Jonás Trueba, Sibyl by Justine Triet, Martin Eden by Pietro Marcello, Adam by Rhys Ernst, The Climb by Michael Covino, Campo by Tiago Hespanha, and Systemsprenger by Nora Fingscheidt;
  • successes from the world’s great festivals, such as Portrait de la jeune fille en feu by Céline Sciamma, Zombie Child by Bertrand Bonello, Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse, Tenki no ko by Makoto Shinkai, It Must Be Heaven by Elia Suleiman, Family Romance, LLC by Werner Herzog, Ang hupa by Lav Diaz, Little Joe by Jessica Hausner, Synonymes by Nadav Lapid, Judy by Rupert Goold, Wasp Network by Olivier Assayas, Late Night by Nisha Ganatra, Gospod postoi, imeto i ‘e Petrunija by Teona Strugar Mitevska and many others.
  • Star Wars fans are not left out and Festival do Rio will screen the two most recent episodes of the Star Wars saga: Episode VII – The Force Awakens and Episode VIII – The Last Jedi, in collaboration with the numerous Jedi Council fans, as well as the premier of the latest Star Wars episode, J.J. Abrams’ Episode IX The Rise of Skywalker.
  • Watson Macedo’s classic  Aviso aos Navegantes, the first film restored by the Brazilian Cinema Research Center (CPCB), has a special screening at MAM’s Cinematheque, which is followed by a panel discussing restoration.

The Brazilian films (and co-productions) that will screen at Festival do Rio from 9 to 19 December 2019 include:

PREMIÈRE BRASIL | FICTION | COMPETITION

  • Acqua Movie (Acqua Movie), by Lírio Ferreira, 105 min – PE
  • A Febre (The Fever), by Maya Da-Rin, 98 min – RJ
  • Anna (Anna), by Heitor Dhalia, 106 min – SP
  • Breve Miragem de Sol (Burning Night), by Eryk Rocha, 98 min – SP
  • Fim de Festa (Party Over), by Hilton Lacerda, 94 min – PE
  • M8 – Quando a Morte Socorre a Vida (M8), by Jeferson De, 88 min – RJ
  • Macabro (Macabre), by Marcos Prado, 103 min – RJ
  • Pureza (Pureza – The Movie), by Renato Barbieri, 102 min – DF
  • Três Verões (Three Summers), by Sandra Kogut, 94 min – RJ

PREMIÈRE BRASIL | DOCUMENTARIES | COMPETITION

  • Amazônia sociedade anônima (Amazon Uncovered), by Estevão Ciavatta, 80 min – RJ
  • Favela É Moda (Favela is Fashion), by Emílio Domingos, 75 min – RJ
  • Fé e Fúria (Faith and Fury), by Marcos Pimentel, 103 min – MG
  • Flores do Cárcere (Prison Flowers ), by Paulo Caldas and Barbara Cunha, 70 min – SP
  • Mangueira em 2 Tempos (Mangueira in 2 Beats), by Ana Maria Magalhães, 90 min – RJ
  • Minha Fortaleza, os Filhos de Fulano (My Fortress), by Tatiana Lohmann, 84 min – SP
  • Ressaca (Vertigo of Fall), by Vincent Rimbaux and Patrizia Landi, 86 min – RJ
  • Sem Descanso (Restless), by Bernard Attal, 78min – BA

NEW TRENDS | FEATURES | COMPETITION

  • 30 Anos Blues (30 Years Blues), by Andradina Azevedo and Dida Andrade, 91 min – SP
  • A rosa azul de Novalis (The Blue Flower of Novalis), by Gustavo Vinagre and Rodrigo Carneiro, 70 min – SP
  • Casa (Home), by Letícia Simões, 93 min – PE
  • Chão (Landless), by Camila Freitas, 110 min – DF
  • A Torre (The Tower), by Sergio Borges, 72 min – MG
  • Sem Seu Sangue (Sick, Sick, Sick), by Alice Furtado, 100 min – RJ
  • Sete Anos em Maio (Seven Years in May), by Affonso Uchôa, 42 min – MG
  • Terminal Praia Grande (Terminal Station), by Mavi Simão, 74 min – MA
PREMIÈRE BRASIL |SHORTS | COMPETITION
  • A Mentira (The Lie), by Klaus Diehl and Rafael Spínola, FIC, 10 min – RJ
  • Apneia (Apnea), by Carol Sakura and Walkir Fernandes, FIC, 15 min – PR
  • As Viajantes (The Travelers), by Davi Mello, FIC, 11 min – SP
  • Bicha-bomba (Queer-Bomb), by Renan de Cillo, DOC, 8 min – PR
  • Carne (Flesh), by Camila Kater, DOC, 12 min – SP
  • Carvão (Coal), by Miguel Guimarães de Goes, FIC, 15 min – RJ
  • Copacabana Madureira (Around Copacabana), by Leonardo Martinelli, DOC, 18 min – RJ
  • Enraizada (Rooted), by Tiago Delácio, DOC, 8 min – PE
  • Nosso Tempo (Our Time), by André Emidio, FIC, 15 min – RJ
  • Quando a Chuva Vem? (When Will it Rain?), by Jefferson Batista, FIC, 8 min – PE
  • Sangro (I Bleed), by Tiago Minamisawa, Bruno H. Castro e Guto BR, DOC, 7 min – SP

NEW DIRECTIONS | SHORTS | COMPETITION

  • Baile (Summer Ball), by Cíntia Domit Bittar, FIC, 15 min – SC
  • Bonde (Bonde), by Asaph Luccas, FIC, 18 min – SP
  • Codinome Breno (Code Name Breno), by Manoel Batista, DOC, 20 min – RN
  • Entre (Between), by Ana Carolina Marinho and Bárbara Santos, FIC, 15 min – SP
  • Histórias para Contar (Breaking the Silence), by Julia Lemos Lima, DOC, 25 min – RJ
  • Revoada (Take Wing), by Victor Costa Lopes, FIC, 14 min – CE
  • Sem Asas (Wingless), by Renata Martins , FIC, 20 min – SP

PREMIÈRE BRASIL | FICTION | HORS CONCOURS

  • Abe (Abe), by Fernando Grostein Andrade, 85 min – SP
  • A Divisão (The Division), by Vicente Amorim, 134 min – RJ
  • Aos Nossos Filhos (Our Children), by Maria de Medeiros, 105 min – SP
  • Boca do Ouro (Golden Mouth), by Daniel Filho, 93 min – RJ
  • Carlinhos e Carlão (Macho Man), by Pedro Amorim, 93 min – RJ
  • Depois a Louca Sou Eu (Losing My Marbles), by Julia Rezende, 86 min – RJ
  • Intervenção (Intervention), by Caio Cobra, 90 min – RJ
  • O Traidor (Il Traditore), by Marco Bellocchio, 145 min – Itály, France, Brazil, Germany
  • Pacarrete (Pacarrete), by Allan Deberton, 97 min – CE
  • Pacificado (Pacified), by Paxton Winters, 120 min – SP
  • Piedade (Mercy), by Cláudio Assis, 98 min – RJ
  • Veneza (Venice), by Miguel Falabella, 93 min – RJ

PREMIÈRE BRASIL | DOCUMENTARIES | HORS CONCOURS

  • Babenco – Alguém tem que ouvir o coração e dizer: Parou (Babenco – Tell Me When I Die), by Bárbara Paz, 75 min – SP
  • Barretão (Barretão), by Marcelo Santiago, 85 min – RJ
  • Encarcerados (Jailers.doc), by Claudia Calbri, Fernando G. Andrade and Pedro Bial, 72 min – SP

NEW DIRECTIONS | HORS CONCOURS

  • Sofá (Firefly), by Bruno Safadi, 71 min – RJ
  • Segundo Tempo (Second Half), by Rubens Rewald, 107 min – SP

PREMIÈRE BRASIL | SHORTS | HORS CONCOURS

  • Alfredinho (Alfredinho), by Roberto Berliner, DOC, 15 min – RJ
  • Amnestia (Amnestia), by Susanna Lira, DOC, 15 min – RJ
  • Tuã Ingugu [Olhos d’Água] (Water Eyes), by Daniela Thomas, DOC, 9 min – RJ

PREMIÈRE BRASIL | MUSICAL PORTRAITS

  • 30 Dias – Um carnaval entre a alegria e a desilusão (30 Days), by Valmir Moratelli, 72 min – RJ
  • A Maldita (A Maldita), by Tetê Mattos, 80 min – RJ
  • Arto Lindsay 4D (Arto Lindsay 4D), by André Lavaquial, 74 min – RJ
  • Blitz, O Filme (Blitz, The Movie), by Paulo Fontenelle, 90 min – RJ
  • Chorão: Marginal Alado (Outcast Rockstar), by Felipe Novaes, 75 min – SP
  • Gilberto Gil Antologia Vol.1 (1968/87) (Gilberto Gil Anthology Vol.1 (1968/87), by Lula Buarque de Hollanda, 73 min – RJ
PREMIÈRE BRASIL | UNIQUE ITINERARIES
  • A Mulher da Luz Própria (The Woman With Her Own Light), by Sinai Sganzerla, 74 min – SP
  • A Última Gravação (The Last Audition), by Isabel Cavalcanti and Celia Freitas, 71 min – RJ
  • Banquete Coutinho (A Treat of Coutinho), by Josafá Veloso, 74 min – SP
  • Madame (Madam), by André da Costa Pinto and Nathan Cirino, 80 min – RJ
  • Movimentos do Invisível (Movements of the Invisible), by Flávia Guayer and Letícia Monte, 75 min – RJ
  • Quatro Dias com Eduardo (Four Days with Eduardo), by Victor Hugo Fiuza, 76 min – RJ

PREMIÈRE BRASIL |  FRONTIERS

  • A Nossa Bandeira Jamais Será Vermelha (Our Flag Will Never Be Red), by Pablo Lopez Guelli, 72 min – SP
  • O Mês Que Não Terminou (Endless June – Brazil’s New Political Culture), by Francisco Bosco e Raul Mourão, 90 min – RJ
  • O Paradoxo da Democracia (The Paradox of Democracy), by Belisário Franca, 71 min – RJ
  • Outubro (October), by Maria Ribeiro and Loiro Cunha, 79 min – SP
  • Partida (Departure), by Caco Ciocler, 93 min – SP

PREMIÈRE BRASIL | GENERATIONS

  • Alice Júnior (Alice Júnior), by Gil Baroni, 86 min – PR
  • Lugar de Fala (Place of Speech), by Felipe Nepomuceno, 74 min – RJ
  • Que os Olhos Ruins Não te Enxerguem (May The Evil Eyes Not See You), by Roberto Maty, 76 min – SPJ
  • Raia 4 (Lane 4), by Emiliano Cunha, 96 min – RS

PREMIÈRE LATINA

  • Aos Olhos de Ernesto (Through Ernesto’s Eyes), by Ana Luiza Azevedo, 123 min – RS
  • Breve historia del planeta verde (Brief Story From the Green Planet), by Santiago Loza, 75 min – Argentina, Germany, Brazil, Spain
  • La Arrancada (On the Starting Line), by Aldemar Matias, 63 min – France, Cuba, Brazil
  • Nona. Si me mojan, yo los quemo (Nona. If They Soak Me, I’ll Burn Them), by Camila José Donoso, 86 min – Chile, Brazil, France, South Korea
  • Poetas del Cielo (Sky Poets), by Emilio Maillé, 101 min – Brazil, México

PANORAMA

  • Doidos de Pedra (Crazy in Stone), by Luiz Eduardo Ozório, 80 min – RJ
  • Família de Axé (Axé family), by Tetê Moraes, 76 min – RJ

Some of the international films screening between 9 and 19 December 2019 at Festival do Rio include:

PANORAMA  2019

  • Amundsen by Espen Sandberg
  • Ang hupa by Lav Diaz
  • Aspromonte – La terra degli ultimi by Mimmo Calopresti
  • A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood by Marielle Heller
  • Bombshell by Jay Roach
  • Chambre 212 by Christophe Honoré
  • The Current War by Alfonso Gomez-Rejon
  • Der Boden unter den Füßen by Marie Kreutze
  • Dernier amour by Benoît Jacquot
  • Diego Maradona by Asif Kapadia
  • Doidos de Pedra by Luiz Eduardo Ozório
  • Dolce Fine Giornata by Jacek Borcuch
  • Être vivant et le savoir by Alain Cavalier
  • Família de Axé by Tetê Moraes
  • Family Romance, LLC by Werner Herzog
  • La fille au bracelet by Stéphane Demoustier
  • Frankie by Ira Sachs
  • Gospod postoi, imeto i’ e Petrunija by Teona Strugar Mitevska
  • A Hidden Life by Terrence Malick
  • Les hirondelles de Kaboul by Zabou Breitman, Eléa Gobbé-Mévellec
  • Honey Boy by Alma Har’el
  • It Must Be Heaven by Elia Suleiman
  • Le jeune Ahmed by Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Luc Dardenne
  • Jojo Rabbit by Taika Waititi
  • Judy by Rupert Goold
  • Just Mercy by  Destin Daniel Cretton
  • Late Night by Nisha Ganatra
  • Little Joe by Jessica Hausner
  • Madre by Rodrigo Sorogoyen
  • Martin Eden by Pietro Marcello
  • Matthias et Maxime by Xavier Dolan
  • Les misérables by Ladj Ly
  • Nomad: In the Footsteps of Bruce Chatwin by Werner Herzog
  • Nur eine Frau by Sherry Hormann
  • Persona non grata, by Roschdy Zem
  • Portrait de la jeune fille en feu by Céline Sciamma
  • Répertoire des villes disparues by Denis Côté
  • Richard Jewell by Clint Eastwood
  • Sibyl by  Justine Triet
  • Skin by Guy Nattiv
  • Sorry We Missed You by Ken Loach
  • State Funeral by Sergei Loznitsa
  • Synonymes by Nadav Lapid
  • Technoboss by João Nicolau
  • Il testimone invisibile by Stefano Mordini
  • Tommaso by Abel Ferrara
  • La virgen de agosto by Jonás Trueba
  • Vitalina Varela by Pedro Costa
  • Wasp Network by Olivier Assayas
  • White Lie by Yonah Lewis and Calvin Thomas
  • Zombi Child by Bertrand Bonello

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

  • Hyenes by Djibril Diop Mambéty
  • In Vanda’s Room by Pedro Costa
  • Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, by J.J. Abrams
  • Star Wars, The Last Jedi by Rian Johnson
  • Star Wars: The Force Awakens by J.J. Abrams
  • Touki Bouki, by Djibril Diop Mambety

EXPECTATIONS 2019

  • 100 kilos d’étoiles by Marie-Sophie Chambon
  • Adam by Rhys Ernst
  • Akik maradtak by Barnabás Tóth
  • Alice by Josephine Mackerras
  • Alva by Ico Costa
  • And Then We Danced by Levan Akin
  • Bajkonur, Terra by Andrea Sorini
  • Campo by Tiago Hespanha
  • The Climb by Michael Covino
  • Deux by Filippo Meneghetti
  • Di yi ci de li bie by Lina Wang
  • Dylda by Kantemir Balagov
  • Huo zhe chang zhe by Johnny Ma
  • Hva vil folk si by Iram Haq
  • On ment toujours à ceux qu’on aime by Sandrine Dumas
  • O que arde by Oliver Laxe
  • Pesar-Madar by Mahnaz Mohammadi
  • Pupille by Jeanne Herry
  • Savovi by Miroslav Terzic
  • Systemsprenger by Nora Fingscheidt
  • Les traducteurs by Régis Roinsard
  • Una ventana al mar by Miguel Ángel Jiménez
  • Vif-argent by Stéphane Batut

LATIN PREMIERE

  • Alelí by Leticia Jorge Romero
  • Aos Olhos de Ernesto by Ana Luiza Azevedo
  • La Arrancada by Aldemar Matias
  • Así Habló el Cambista by Federico Veiroj
  • Breve historia del planeta verde by Santiago Loza
  • Canción Sin Nombre by Melina León
  • Ceniza Negra by Sofía Quirós Ubeda
  • El Diablo entre las Piernas by Arturo Ripstein
  • Litigante by Franco Lolli
  • Mano de obra by David Zonana
  • Nona. Si me mojan, yo los quemo by Camila José Donoso
  • Poetas del Cielo by Emilio Maillé

MIDNIGHT MOVIES

  • Amazing Grace by  Alan Elliott, Sydney Pollack
  • Aquarela by Victor Kossakovsky
  • Countdown by Justin Dec
  • Le Daim by Quentin Dupieux
  • The Dead Don’t Die by Jim Jarmusch
  • O Filme do Bruno Aleixo by João Moreira, Pedro Santo
  • Hatsukoi by Takashi Miike
  • The Kingmaker by Lauren Greenfield
  • Lemebel by Joanna Reposi Garibaldi
  • The Lodge by Veronika Franz, Severin Fiala
  • Memory: The Origins of Alien by Alexandre O. Philippe
  • Nan Fang Che Zhan De Ju Hui, by Diao Yinan
  • Pelikanblut by Katrin Gebbe
  • Shooting the Mafia by Kim Longinotto
  • Tenki no ko by Makoto Shinkai

UNIQUE ITINERARIES

  • Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Justin Pemberton
  • Citizen K by Alex Gibney
  • Cunningham by Alla Kovgan
  • Said: The Art of Pauline Kael by Rob Garver Storia di B, a scomparsa di mia madre by Beniamino Barrese
  • Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders What She
  • Unstoppable: Sean Scully and the Art of Everything by Nick Willing
  • XY Chelsea by Tim Travers Hawkins

Rio’s Flamengo wins the 2019 Libertadores Cup and Brazilian Championship

One of Rio and Brazil’s most popular football sides, Flamengo, won the Copa Libertadores, the South American equivalent of Europe’s  Champions League, by beating Argentina’s River Plate in the final played in Lima, Peru, on Saturday 23 November 2019.

Flamengo’s Gabriel Barbosa scored twice in a dramatic final five minutes as the team came from a goal down to beat River Plate 2-1 and win its first Copa Libertadores title since 1981.

The final of South America’s biggest club football competition, which started in 1960, was moved from Santiago to the Peruvian city because of unrest in Chile’s capital. This was the first time since 1988 that the tournament has been decided in a one-off game.

Flamengo has now qualified for the 2019 FIFA Club World Cup in Qatar and could face European champions Liverpool if they both reach the final on 21 December, as they did back in 1981 when Flamengo won 3-0, inspired by the legendary Zico.

Then on Sunday, 24 November, Flamengo learnt they had won the Brazilian league for the seventh time after Gremio had beaten Palmeiras, meaning they could no longer have its point total surpassed.

Condé Nast Johansens Awards for Excellence 2020

Eight Brazilian properties have picked up Condé Nast Johansens Awards for Excellence for 2020 in the Central and South America region. Including the Readers Award. They are:

Best for Weddings, Parties or Special Occasions: HOTEL MAITEI (BAHIA)

Best Hotel with Spa: NANNAI RESORT & SPA (PERNAMBUCO)

Best Immersive Experience: RANCHO DO PEIXE (CEARA)

Best Serviced Accommodation: ESTRELA D’ÁGUA (BAHIA)

Best for Families: VILA KALANGO (CEARA)

Best Countryside Hotel (or Lodge): COMUNA DO IBITIPOCA (MINAS GERAIS)

Best for Sustainability: CASA DOS ARANDIS (BAHIA)

Readers’ Award: TOCA DA CORUJA (RIO GRANDE DO NORTE)